The Science of Willpower – the Power of Religion?

February 15th, 2012

I have recently come across several pieces from scientists skeptical of religion suggesting that they are coming to see significant benefits to both individuals and society of religion. Religious people tend to have higher self control, they are more trusting, and they are happier, than people who are not religious. So, is this benefit the gift of a divine being, or is it an emergent property of a non-conscious evolutionary selection process? (more…)

How to Talk to an Atheist

November 11th, 2011

How to Talk to an Atheist

Kathy, in corresponding with me about ISAS, has shared some of her experiences in talking with atheists. She offers a succinct explanation of the causal argument for the existence of God, and I add some additional comments on the challenge of building a dialogue between those who believe in God and those who reject such beliefs. (more…)

May 16, 2011. Synopsis – Theistic Evolution

May 23rd, 2011

On May 16, 2011, about 20 participants joined in the second ISAS discussion forum. Our guest was Dr. Reuben Bell, and he reviewed his background in science and religion and the “two hats” he experienced growing up in Oklahoma – one a firmly religious, fundamentalist background – the second a positivist, scientifically based education. Eventually he left the first hat behind, but always wondered if the two hats could be united in a consistent spiritual-natural framework. He then gave us a stunning introduction to his current initiative – the development of a theistic synthesis of the science of natural evolution. (more…)

May 2, 2011. Synopsis – What is Truth?

May 3rd, 2011

On May 2, 2011, about 20 participants joined a lively discussion on the difficult question of how we determine that something is “true”. This included an exploration of gaps in the ability of science and math to prove beyond doubt that something is true, and reflections on whether science and religion are distinct areas of inquiry or whether there are ways these spheres of understanding can inform and support each other. Many topics for potential future consideration were identified. (more…)

Science – Losing Credibility

April 24th, 2011

The following is a comment posted April 24, 2011, (on scientificamerican.com) in reply to a Commentary titled “Trust Me, I’m a Scientist”, in the May 2011 issue of Scientific American by Daniel T. Willingham. (more…)

The Science – Religion Debate

March 21st, 2011

This list includes a variety of useful resources on the science-religion debates. It is not, by any means, exhaustive, as a google search on the topic will demonstrate. As I come across additional materials, the list below will be updated.
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Integrating Science and Spirituality – Why Is This Important?

March 5th, 2011

Over the past four hundred years, the scientific mode of understanding the world has achieved remarkable success.  The technologies that have grown from scientific inquiry have propelled the human race into a prosperity and superfluity that would have been unimaginable to anyone living in a pre-industrial society.  The resulting credibility gave science an authoritative claim to being the truth about the world.

One might wonder why any alternative claim to truth, such as through religious experience or revelation, could survive.  Yet religion has survived, and in many ways has flourished.  One reason is that science has generally not claimed to be able to answer all questions about human life – including the questions of where the world came from and why we are here.  Another reason is that science has been inadequate in dealing with our conscious, emotional and creative experience.   However, religious ideas have, with few exceptions, ceded considerable territory to scientific ones in these four centuries.

In the past few decades, the uneasy truce between science and religion, if there was one, seems to have broken.  Pre-eminent scientists such as E.O. Wilson, Stephen Hawking and others, have felt compelled to attack all religion as irrational superstition.  Many religious adherents have raised strident voices supporting biblical literalism and demeaning scientists’ claim to truth – enough of them serve on local school boards to significantly influence the teaching of science in public schools.

The stridency and bitterness of these exchanges are of significant concern and undermine critically needed civil discourse on the ideas and changes that are shaping our lives.  In contrast to the public squabbling, the common sense view of most people is that scientific and spiritual modes of understanding the world are both valid and do not contradict each other.  And fortunately, this topic has been getting increasing attention by writers, thinkers, scientists, theologians and the media in recent years.  In fact, the literature on efforts to understand and explore the interface of science and spirituality has been exploding.

As someone who is steeped in mathematics, science and philosophy, I do believe that science is valid and that the scientific endeavor has brought incredible benefits to human life and transformed our understanding of and relationship to the natural world.  However, the history of science also shows that scientific knowledge evolves over time.  Time and again, scientists over-reach the actual results they have observed – and their conclusions are reversed or amended by the next generation using better tools and more refined theories.

At the same time, my experience in life has reinforced my belief that there are spiritual truths that transcend the limitations of the natural world.  This spiritual knowledge is critical to our choices about how to live and how, ultimately, to be happy.   We engage in the process of understanding spiritual truth in very different ways than we do scientific truth.  This does not mean that either mode of knowing is invalid.

So how do we integrate our scientific and spiritual understanding of the world and our life in the world?  Are they dealing in totally separate realms of knowledge and, as a result, they do not and should not intersect?  Or are there possibilities for integrating the two modes of understanding – can they be complementary?  And if so, what can we gain in our spiritual inquiry from an understanding of science – and, correspondingly, what can we learn about science from our understanding of spiritual truth?

That is the purpose of the ISAS Forum.  I invite you to help me find answers to these questions.  Please post your thoughts and reactions to what I and others have to offer.  Together, perhaps, we can hope to influence the course of the ongoing debates and make a positive contribution to human understanding.

Thank you for your interest. George Gantz